What Biden Can Do Without Congress

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What Biden Can Do Without Congress

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Revolving Door Project Exposes Industry Agenda

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Revolving Door Project Exposes Industry Agenda

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The Revolving Door Project on Fighting Monopoly Power

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The Revolving Door Project on Fighting Monopoly Power

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About the Revolving Door Project

The Revolving Door Project (RDP), a project of the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), scrutinizes executive branch appointees to ensure they use their office to serve the broad public interest, rather than to entrench corporate power or seek personal advancement.

Projects

The Agency Spotlight

The Agency Spotlight tracks appointments to leadership positions at thirty-nine independent federal agencies through the confirmation process and beyond. Additionally, for three agencies — the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) — the Spotlight monitors and exhibits key votes.

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Industry Agenda

Building off the work of our Personnel Map, the Industry Agenda is a report series that looks at how different industries seek to influence the staffing of the Biden Administration. In these reports, we take a closer look at the policy issues at stake for various industries, as well as the agencies and offices they will be looking to influence.

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Personnel Map

The Personnel Map aims to demonstrate the breadth and depth of corporate America’s interest in the executive branch of the federal government. The map ties major economic sectors to the individual political positions that have the power to regulate, bring enforcement actions against, or disburse funds to the companies in that sector.

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Our Blog

August 08, 2022 | Washington Monthly

Hannah Story Brown

Op-Ed

2020 Election/TransitionClimateDepartment of JusticeIndependent Agencies

Why Is Merrick Garland Sticking with Donald Trump on Climate Lawsuits?

It started with Boulder in early February. Then came Baltimore and San Mateo in April. Now Honolulu and Maui are the latest municipalities to overcome a crucial legal hurdle in their fight to make fossil fuel companies pay for their role in climate change. After years of obstruction, it looks like state courts will hear arguments from these cities—as well as several states—that big energy companies knowingly concealed and misrepresented the harms of their products, contributing to climate damages these regions face. Five federal appeals courts have green-lit suing the fossil fuel giants in state court, where these state and local governments have a better chance of prevailing. The stakes are massive: requiring fossil fuel companies to foot the bill for climate change–related damages to U.S. cities and states could easily run into the tens of billions.

August 04, 2022 | The American Prospect

Timi Iwayemi

Op-Ed

Congressional OversightcryptocurrencyFinancial Regulation

Proposed Stablecoin Legislation Is Worse Than Nothing

Better still, the government could consider more aggressive action. Application of existing law would bring some stability to the stablecoin space, but there is one more simple and effective option: banning them outright. Stablecoins are an essential component of a deeply fraudulent industry that is financially and environmentally destructive. Guaranteeing their existence is an unnecessary risk.

July 29, 2022 | The American Prospect

Hannah Story Brown Glenna Li

Op-Ed

Congressional OversightEthics in GovernmentIRSRevolving Door

It’s Past Time to Replace IRS Chief Charles Rettig

Earlier this month, The New York Times broke the story that former FBI director James Comey and his former deputy director Andrew McCabe, both loathed and eventually fired by President Trump, also both underwent rare and intensive tax audits under the National Research Program, which studies tax compliance and calculates the “tax gap” (the difference between legally owed tax and what is actually paid). Out of around 154 million annual tax returns, the National Research Program selected just 5,000 tax returns in 2017 and 8,000 in 2019 to audit. Neither man knew the other had undergone the same audit until a Times reporter told them.

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