Revolving Door Project Exposes Industry Agenda

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Revolving Door Project Exposes Industry Agenda

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The Revolving Door Project on Fighting Monopoly Power

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The Revolving Door Project on Fighting Monopoly Power

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About the Revolving Door Project

The Revolving Door Project (RDP), a project of the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), scrutinizes executive branch appointees to ensure they use their office to serve the broad public interest, rather than to entrench corporate power or seek personal advancement.

Projects

The Agency Spotlight

The Agency Spotlight tracks appointments to leadership positions at thirty-nine independent federal agencies through the confirmation process and beyond. Additionally, for three agencies — the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) — the Spotlight monitors and exhibits key votes.

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Industry Agenda

Building off the work of our Personnel Map, the Industry Agenda is a report series that looks at how different industries seek to influence the staffing of the Biden Administration. In these reports, we take a closer look at the policy issues at stake for various industries, as well as the agencies and offices they will be looking to influence.

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Personnel Map

The Personnel Map aims to demonstrate the breadth and depth of corporate America’s interest in the executive branch of the federal government. The map ties major economic sectors to the individual political positions that have the power to regulate, bring enforcement actions against, or disburse funds to the companies in that sector.

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Our Blog

January 13, 2022 | Democracy Journal

Jeff Hauser Max Moran

Op-Ed

Corporate Crackdown

What Biden’s Message Should Be

Americans were more divided than ever in 2021, but everyone in the country still agreed on one thing: The Democratic Party has a messaging problem.

“We’ve got a national branding problem that is probably deeper than a lot of people suspect,” Democratic pollster Brian Stryker, who is currently working with the centrist think tank Third Way to understand why Democrats lost the recent governors’ race in Virginia told The New York Times. “I’m not going to argue it’s working right now, but I need it to work when it matters,” Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-NY), chair of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee told The Washington Post in November of the Democrats’ efforts to sell their legislative victories. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) seemingly agrees, telling attendees at a recent fundraising dinner that “Democrats are terrible at messaging. It’s just a fact.”

January 11, 2022

Fatou Ndiaye

Blog Post

ClimateFinancial RegulationGovernment CapacityIndependent Agencies

Climate Finance Capacity Project: Securities and Exchange Commission

Climate change poses a serious threat to everything the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is meant to protect and oversee. The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CTFC)’s “Managing Climate Risk in the U.S. The Financial System ”report makes this abundantly clear. The report concludes that climate change may “exacerbate existing, non-climate related vulnerabilities in the financial system, with potentially serious consequences for market stability”. Furthermore, the physical and transitional risks of climate change will likely lead to systemic and sub-systemic financial shocks. These shocks would cause “unprecedented disruption in the proper functioning of financial markets and institutions” and further marginalize communities underserved by the financial system. To fulfill its mandate, of maintaining fair, orderly, and efficient markets, protecting investors, and facilitating capital formation, the SEC must proactively ensure there is enough personnel to monitor and enforce regulations that will keep markets stable and adaptable. 

January 11, 2022

Press Release

ClimateGovernment CapacityIndependent Agencies

New Report Warns That Insufficient Capacity at The SEC Might Limit its Role In the Fight Against Climate Change

Today, the Revolving Door Project released its SEC Climate Capacity Report examining the detrimental impact of capacity shortfalls on the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)’s climate work. This report is the second installment of its Climate Finance Capacity Project. The Climate Finance Capacity Project explores the power and responsibility that each of the Financial Stability Oversight Council’s member agencies has to address the climate crisis and consider how resource limitations threaten to limit their impact. 

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