The Revolving Door Project on Fighting Monopoly Power

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The Revolving Door Project on Fighting Monopoly Power

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The Revolving Door Project Responds to Coronavirus

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The Revolving Door Project Responds to Coronavirus

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About the Revolving Door Project

The Revolving Door Project (RDP), a project of the Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR), scrutinizes executive branch appointees to ensure they use their office to serve the broad public interest, rather than to entrench corporate power or seek personal advancement.

Projects

The Agency Spotlight

The Agency Spotlight tracks appointments to leadership positions at thirty-nine independent federal agencies through the confirmation process and beyond. Additionally, for three agencies — the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) — the Spotlight monitors and exhibits key votes.

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No Corporate Cabinet

No Corporate Cabinet serves as a central hub for information about, and activism related to, the Biden transition. We seek to ensure that the Biden administration can live up to the commitments his campaign made to the American people: To solve the twin crises of the pandemic and economic collapse and to set our society on a better, more equitable, and more just course.

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Personnel Map

The Personnel Map aims to demonstrate the breadth and depth of corporate America’s interest in the executive branch of the federal government. The map ties major economic sectors to the individual political positions that have the power to regulate, bring enforcement actions against, or disburse funds to the companies in that sector.

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Our Work

January 26, 2021

Dorothy Slater Zena Wolf

Blog Post

2020 Election/TransitionClimateFinancial Regulation

Why The Next CFTC Chairperson Must Prioritize Climate Action Over Market Fads

Initially created to regulate futures derivatives on crops that had yet to be harvested, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) holds newfound possibility in the coming decade. It is absolutely crucial that a modern-day CFTC taps into the power it already holds to lead on climate action. Naturally, this necessitates a leader with a proven record of taking on corporate power. Any appointee should be prepared to advocate for the public interest, acknowledge the current reality of climate decay we find ourselves in, and creatively apply tools of the government to take immediate action.

January 22, 2021

Andrea Beaty Miranda Litwak

Blog Post

2020 Election/TransitionAnti-MonopolyTech

Big Tech’s Top Picks to Lead DOJ Antitrust Division

Big Tech has a huge stake in who Biden ultimately staffs his antitrust and tech regulators. These individuals will decide how aggressively to carry out Biden’s promises of reining in the political and market power of these companies. If Big Tech gets its way, Biden will staff his antitrust teams with its attorneys and allies, who have pushed back against calls to break up these monopolies and protected them against regulation and enforcement. But if Biden wants to keep his campaign promises to take on monopolies, he must shut the revolving door between the federal government and Big Tech. That starts by rejecting for top jobs the following Big Tech allies.

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