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August 03, 2021

Nika Hajikhodaverdikhan

Blog Post

Criminal JusticeDepartment of Justice

How Biden and Garland’s DOJ Can Increase Community Oversight of the Police

As people across the country continue to demand greater accountability for police misconduct, Revolving Door Project is working through its Police Accountability series to make clear how the Department of Justice can answer some of those calls. Part 1 of the series scrutinized the lack of federal, systematic data collection on law enforcement misconduct barring police accountability, explored pockets of power within the DOJ laying the groundwork for police oversight, and suggested 3 proposals. Part 2 of the Police Accountability series called for the relaunching of the Bureau of Justice Statistics’ Arrest-Related Deaths program with a tested redesigned hybrid methodology. This piece introduces a second proposal wherein new conditions are placed on grants awarded out of the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services’ (COPS) in an effort to leverage federal funds to actualize grassroots governed police oversight mechanisms.

August 02, 2021

Sion Bell

Blog Post

cryptocurrencyIRS

Good News for the IRS: The Economic Substance Doctrine Already Prevents Crypto Tax Avoidance

Much has been made of the ways that crypto investors have been able to skirt existing tax rules to reap massive financial gains tax free. The underlying premise is that because of loopholes in tax laws, crypto investors are able to legally avoid taxes — as opposed to illegal tax evasion — and that only by fixing our laws to close those loopholes can we ensure that crypto holders pay their taxes.

July 28, 2021

Sion Bell

Blog Post

Ethics in Government

Perdue’s Sweetheart Land Deal Demonstrates Need for Stronger Ethics Rules

Since the Trump administration, the Revolving Door Project has repeatedly brought attention to the importance of strong government ethics rules, including by ensuring that presidential nominees are free from corporate conflicts of interest and forthcoming about their financial ties. But while rules already exist that require nominees to disclose financial information, including assets and recent major purchases, a recent story by the Washington Post illustrates a lingering loophole in our ethics laws for Cabinet nominees. The story centers on Trump’s then-prospective nominee for Agriculture Secretary, Sonny Perdue, and a particularly fishy real estate deal.