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May 11, 2020

Eleanor Eagan Jeff Hauser

Blog Post

Congressional OversightEthics in GovernmentRevolving Door

The Revolving Door Project Responds to Coronavirus

In the space of just a few weeks, the coronavirus outbreak has called into question almost every aspect of the political consensus of the last few decades. As it turns out, selling government for parts (aka “privatizing” or “reinventing” government), rolling back regulations, starving governing bodies of resources, and holding those who attempt to serve the public good in contempt, has left us exceedingly vulnerable.

April 08, 2020 | Talking Points Memo

Max Moran

Op-Ed

Department of JusticeEthics in Government

What Will Feds Do About Corporate Bailout Bill Corruption? Look To Walmart's Opioids Case

If and when we (likely inevitably) learn that bailed-out companies and multi-trillion dollar slush funds misuse the public disaster relief dollars doled out by the Trump administration in the wake of the pandemic, we should turn back to this Walmart story for further evidence of why big corporations are rarely held accountable.

April 06, 2020 | Alternet

Max Moran

Op-Ed

Ethics in Government

Jared Kushner is the point man for private profiteering on the coronavirus response

Hot off of singlehandedly ending the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, America’s Son-In-Law-In-Chief has put himself in charge of handling half of the White House response to the coronavirus crisis. Didn’t you know that? No? Oh, well, it seems the White House just decided that, ah, the people didn’t need to hear about this. Oh, and FYI, most of his team are from the private sector. That’s not a problem, Congressional Democrats, is it?

March 24, 2020

Eleanor Eagan

Blog Post

Ethics in GovernmentIndependent Agencies

SEC Must Build Public Trust in Government by Policing Federal Officials’ Crisis Profiteering

Amidst an economy-crashing pandemic, several Senators appear to be more concerned with their stock portfolios than with the well-being of their constituents or with their Senatorial responsibility to offer a solution. Sadly, this will almost certainly not be the only instance of crisis profiteering during the coronavirus outbreak.

February 14, 2019

Jeff Hauser

Letter

Ethics in GovernmentFinancial RegulationIndependent Agencies

Letter to the Federal Housing Finance Agency and Treasury Inspectors General

Dear Inspector General Wertheimer and Inspector General Thorson:

We write to request an investigation into whether officials at the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) or Office of the Comptroller of the Currency leaked information about the agency’s plans regarding reform to the Government Sponsored Entities (GSEs) with intent to manipulate markets for the benefit of investors in preferred and common shares. Sharing this confidential, market-moving information with the intent of benefiting Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac’s shareholders would represent a breach of securities law.

January 16, 2019

Eleanor Eagan Jeff Hauser

Blog Post

Congressional OversightEthics in GovernmentFinancial Regulation

One Trump Appointee, Two Jobs, Too Many Causes for Concern

Eleanor Eagan, Jeff Hauser, and Adewale Maye
You have likely not heard of Joseph Otting, as he has generated comparatively little attention amidst the circus that is President Trump’s executive branch. However, he is a deeply problematic official who has quietly amassed power in critical agencies that receive far too little attention given their impact on the economy and housing. Amazingly, Otting seems to be using these agencies to act upon resentments he developed as a “controversial,” at best, banking executive, making him a perfect representative of why we are concerned by the revolving door problem in our federal government.

November 13, 2018

Jeff Hauser

Blog Post

Ethics in GovernmentRevolving Door

How Goldman Sachs Still Holds Sway at SEC

With the departures of Gary Cohn, Steve Bannon, and Dina Powell from the White House, has Goldman Sachs’ initial influence on the Trump Administration dwindled?

CNN asked that question this spring, noting that “one by one, almost all the high-profile Goldman Sachs alums have left the White House.” But as CNN, to its credit, also noted that while who is up and who is down in the Trump White House changes, leadership at the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has been more stable — and Goldman Sachs’ former lawyer, Chairman Jay Clayton, runs that key agency.

July 27, 2018 | American Constitution Society Blog

Jeff Hauser

Blog PostOp-Ed

Administrative LawEthics in Government

Trump-Russia Issue Helps Highlight Exactly What’s At Stake In Kavanaugh Fight

The most important battleground of the Kavanaugh confirmation fight is not a specific issue, but whether people pay attention to the nomination itself. To some, the focus on Trump and Russia is a distraction from the Supreme Court fight.  But, in reality, the focus on Trump and Russia helps highlight exactly what’s at stake in this fight.

May 16, 2018 | Rewire

Jeff Hauser

Op-Ed

Ethics in Government

Trump’s Corruption: The Single Most Important—and Neglected—Campaign Issue of 2018

From cable news to social media, from the NFL to Kanye West’s Twitter feed — people spend an enormous amount of time discussing President Donald Trump. Oddly, the only people not spending much time discussing Trump — his corruption, his malfeasance, his lack of fitness for office — are the ones who have the most invested in publicizing Trump’s blatant corruption: the Democrats. As evidenced by recent national security news, Trump’s corruption poses a clear and present danger to your wallet, your economic future, and the health and well-being of the planet. And yet somehow, the Democrats are failing to connect the dots.

March 14, 2018 | Slate

Jeff Hauser

Op-Ed

Ethics in GovernmentRevolving Door

How Jeff Sessions Is Sneaking Trump Allies Into Key DOJ Positions That Normally Require Senate Confirmation

From investigating money laundering to enforcing America’s drug laws, U.S. attorneys possess a considerable amount of discretion in how to allocate the Department of Justice’s scarce law enforcement resources. Each of the 93 U.S. attorneys has the ability to make prosecutions of various federal statutes more or less likely and sentencing for any violations more or less draconian.