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Blog Post | March 18, 2020

The Revolving Door Project Responds to Coronavirus

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In the space of just a few weeks, the coronavirus outbreak has called into question almost every aspect of the political consensus of the last few decades. As it turns out, selling government for parts (aka “privatizing” or “reinventing” government), rolling back regulations, starving governing bodies of resources, and holding those who attempt to serve the public good in contempt, has left us exceedingly vulnerable. 

Revolving Door Project has been trying to drive home this point since its beginning. Our mission has always been to “scrutinize executive branch appointees to ensure they use their office to serve the broad public interest, rather than to entrench corporate power or seek personal advancement.” Trump has long embodied the antithesis of our vision, and as we have long argued, the ways in which Trump’s corrupt and malevolent mismanagement of the executive branch endangers ordinary Americans ought to be the principal focus on Congress’ oversight, including impeachment.

The coronavirus is providing a massive (although deeply unwelcome) boost to our thesis. No country can yet be said to have this novel outbreak fully under control, but some have been far more successful than others. In countries where government capacity was strong and, in particular, where public health experts were allowed to lead the way, responses were proactive and effective. The United States must prioritize learning from these examples in the outbreak’s aftermath in order to build a governing system that is responsive and capable of advancing the public interest.

Trump’s administration is the most blunt and perverse manifestation of a long trend towards government incapacity. From his first days in office, the President has prioritized cutting budgets, chasing away civil servants, and empowering anti-government ideologues and incompetents. He has succeeded in cutting capacity almost everywhere, something that is becoming painfully clear as we stare down a pandemic for which we are not even remotely prepared. Even with many more weeks to have prepared, we continue to struggle with even the most basic portions of the response, lagging far behind countries like South Korea in our testing capacity. Members of the Revolving Door Project’s team have highlighted the corrupt and incompetent members of Trump’s coronavirus team and the general ineptitude of his response in the hopes of drawing renewed attention to the importance of expert, public-minded personnel. 

As disastrous as Trump and his administration’s response has been, however, it’s important not lose sight of the ways in which it is not unique. Although they may not have taken matters to Trump’s extreme, recent administrations of both parties have been happy to install revolving door figures who work against their agencies’ interests and to starve public institutions of resources. And, as the Project’s Max Moran highlights in Talking Points Memo, many of this administration’s most egregious abuses have not been Trumpian aberrations but “standard issue Republicanism in 2020.” That includes the Mike Pence-led coronavirus task force. 

A Pence-led response is dangerous, not in spite of, but precisely because he is a typical Republican. His coronavirus task force — which includes several Pence loyalists — is not particularly Trumpian. Its members are long-time political operatives, some of whom even have medical degrees. For the most part, their problem is not incompetence. It’s that they apply their competence and considerable resources in exactly the way a “normal” Republican administration would: protection for the powerful, callousness for the afflicted, and a special disdain for the “other.” 

If we fail to acknowledge the ways in which these sorts of positions are normalized, we are unlikely to make the changes that are necessary in the wake of the crisis. 

The Revolving Door Project has also taken a hard look at congressional Democrats’ response to this administration’s historic ineptitude. We find that, even in the face of a disaster of this scale, they remain too timid in challenging the president. Trump’s ineffective response was unfortunately predictable. Lawmakers should have been acting proactively to gather information and push the administration to respond sooner and better. Instead, fear of appearing too “political” in a crisis seems to have lulled them into inaction in the critical early days. 

Even now that lawmakers are pouring all of their time into coronavirus response, they are neglecting oversight and accountability. Neither of Congress’ funding bills have been contingent on greater transparency from the administration and rapid improvements in governance. Only a handful of lawmakers are really pressing administration officials for commitments to do better. In moments like these, we need all branches of government acting at full capacity to mitigate the worst consequences. For Congress, that must include oversight. 

The Revolving Door Project will continue to monitor the coronavirus response in the coming weeks and months with particular attention to the implications for rebuilding government capacity in the aftermath. 


The Project’s coronavirus-related work:


The Trump Administration’s Contemptuous, Pro-Corporate Response to Coronavirus

Andrea Beaty, Eleanor Eagan, and Max Moran | The American Prospect | 2/27/2020

Congressional Democrats Exhibit Symptoms Of A Spinelessness Pandemic 

Eleanor Eagan | Talking Points Memo | 3/6/2020

The Coronavirus Crisis: A Who’s-Who of Trumpian Mismanagement

Max Moran | The Revolving Door Project | 3/11/2020

Trump is Screwing Up His Response to the Coronavirus. House Democrats are Screwing Up their Response to Trump.

Jeff Hauser and Eleanor Eagan | The Daily Beast | 3/12/2020

Trump’s Failing Coronavirus Response is Standard Issue Republicanism in 2020

Max Moran | Talking Points Memo | 3/13/2020

Concrete Solutions to Mitigate the Health and Economic Impacts of the Pandemic

Eileen Appelbaum, Dean Baker, Shawn Fremstad, and Jeff Hauser | CEPR |  3/16/2020

Trump Stimulus Plan: Still Getting Everything Wrong

Eileen Appelbaum, Dean Baker, Jeff Hauser, and Mark Weisbrot | CEPR | 3/19/2020

Good Government Groups Demand SEC Investigate Sen. Richard Burr for Insider Trading

Jeff Hauser and David Segal | 3/20/2020


The Project’s coronavirus-related interviews, quotes, and advocacy:


Jeff Hauser talks coronavirus response with Joe Sudbay on the Michelangelo Signorile Show

Michelangelo Signorile Show | 3/6/2020

Progressive groups urge Supreme Court to broadcast arguments during coronavirus closure

Tucker Higgins | CNBC | 3/13/2020

Jeff Hauser talks coronavirus response on the GOTMFV Show 

GOTMFV Show | 3/16/2020

Pelosi has Trump Over a Barrel

Michael Grunwald | Politico | 3/17/20

Major hotel executive: “I’ve just cut 95% of my staff”

Stephen Gandel | CBS News | 3/18/2020

‘There’s no playbook for this’: Biden trapped in campaign limbo

Marc Caputo | Politico | 3/21/2020

What’s The Best Way To Boost The Economy In A Pandemic?

Gregory Wilpert | The Real News Network | 3/24/2020

Law Prof’s Optimistic COVID-19 Death Toll Prediction Circulated Through the White House. It’s Already Wrong.

Colin Kalmbacher | Law & Crime | 3/24/2020

Progressives Are Divided On What To Do About Coronavirus Bailouts For Big Business

Daniel Marans | Huffpost | 3/24/2020

Unsanitized: Bailouts, A Tradition Unlike Any Other

David Dayen | The American Prospect | 3/25/2020

Coronavirus relief package includes aid for just about everyone, including California interests

Jennifer Haberkorn and Anna M. Phillips | Los Angeles Times | 3/25/2020

The stimulus package is a missed opportunity for American workers

Helaine Olen | The Washington Post | 3/27/2020

Jeff Hauser Talks Bailout on the Rick Smith Show

The Rick Smith Show | 3/30/2020

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